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Agricultural & Environmental Chemistry Graduate Group

4117 Meyer Hall

Davis, CA 95616

(530) 752-4516

AGC Faculty

By Discipline:

Environmental & Analytical Chemistry (EAC)

Biological & Toxicological Chemistry (BTC)

Food & Wine Chemistry (FWC)

Fiber & Polymer Chemistry (FPC)

 

EAC Faculty

Name Contact Information Research Interests
Douglas Adams
Professor Emeritus
Viticulture and Enology
3150 RMI North
(530) 752-1902
Website
Dr. Adams’ research program focuses on grape berry ripening. He has concentrated his efforts in two principal areas: the biochemical changes that occur during ripening, and the development of tannins in skins and seeds of red wine varieties.
Cort Anastasio
Group Chair, Professor
Atmospheric Science Program
3146 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building
(530) 754-6095
Website
Environmental chemistry; chemistry and photochemistry of tropospheric cloud and fog drops and aerosol particles; interactions between these condensed phases and the gas phase.
Lowell Ashbaugh
Retired Associate Researcher
Crocker Nuclear Laboratory
Crocker Nuclear Laboratory Annex
(530) 752-2848
Sources and generation mechanisms of PM10 fugitive dust. In-use motor vehicle emissions and their effect on air pollution in California. Dry deposition of acidic gases and particles inCalifornia. Source/receptor modeling of particles and gases. Interbasin transport of air pollutants in California and the western United States.
Deborah H. Bennett
Associate Professor
Environmental and Occupational Health
Department of Public Health Sciences
One Shields Ave, TB 169
(530) 754-8282
Website
Research interests focus on the fate, transport, and exposure to chemicals in both indoors and multimedia environments within the context of environmental epidemiology and risk assessment.
William H. Casey
Professor
Department of Chemistry
1480 Chemistry Annex
(530) 752-3211
Website
Professor Casey is interested in the reactions between water, rock and minerals. Many weathering phenomena involve reactions with water on mineral surfaces, something which can be mimicked in the laboratory by studying the aqueous chemistry of metal aquo clusters by heteronuclear NMR and MS. Other interests include crystal growth, general cluster chemistry, bio-inorganic chemistry, and chemistry from an environmental aspect.
Victor P. Claassen
Associate Research Soil Scientist
Land Air and Water Resources
2144 PES
(530)752-6514
Website
Soil fertility in wildlands systems; revegetation of drastically disturbed soils with native species, endomycorrhizae; soil organic matter.
Randy Dahlgren
Professor
Soil Science and Pedology/Soil Mineralogy
3134 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building
(530) 752-2814
Website
Interactions of hydrological, geochemical, and biological processes in regulating groundwater and surface water chemistry; forest and rangeland biogeochemistry and trace element biogeochemistry.
Ian C. Faloona
Associate Professor/
Associate Bio-Micrometeorologist
Atmospheric Science
3138 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building
Phone: (530) 752-2044
Website
Research is based on an interdisciplinary, observational approach that ranges across the globe and encompasses three principal areas: atmospheric photochemistry, marine biogeochemistry, and the turbulant dynamics of planetary boundary layers. His group;s work strives, in particular to bridge the fields of micrometeorology and chemistry in the atmosphere and ocean. Scientific experimentation takes place on aircraft, ocean vessels, towers and in the lab using a wide array of optical and mass spectrometric analytical techniques.
Nilesh W. Gaikwad
Associate Professor
Dept. of Nutrition, Environmental Toxicology
3209 Meyer Hall
Phone: (530)-752-5255
Website
The overall objective of our research is to develop tandem mass spectrometry based metabolomics platforms and explore various steroid metabolic pathways in humans. We are also exploring steroid metabolic signatures in various models to develop biomarkers for early detection of cancers, neurological diseases and to study disease mechanisms. In addition, one of the major goals of our lab is to study diet/food components which alter the course of steroid metabolic pathways that are responsible for diseases. We are also interested in elucidating mechanism of action of toxins that can alter steroid metabolic pathways.
Peter G. Green
Associate Research Engineer
Civil and Environmental Engineering
3136 Engineering III
(530) 752-8581
Website
Water quality, air quality, trace metal analysis, trace organic analysis, water resources .
Bradley D. Hanson
Cooperative Extension Weed Science Specialist
Plant Sciences
276 Robbins Hall
(530) 752-8115
Website
Hanson’s research and extension program is focused on management of weeds in agricultural production systems with the goal of increasing economic and environmental sustainability of annual and perennial cropping systems.  This work includes both applied and basic research approaches to integrated pest management solutions for weeds and other pests using a variety of chemical and non-chemical approaches. Much of our current research is focused on herbicide issues including: weed control efficacy, herbicide-resistant weeds, herbicide fate in soil, and crop injury resulting from herbicide drift or other routes of exposure.
Thomas H. Harter
Cooperative Extension Groundwater Hydrologist
Hydrological Sciences
125 Veihmeyer Hall
(530) 752-2709
Website
Flow and transport processes in groundwater and in the vadose zone; non-point source pollution of groundwater; groundwater remediation; groundwater resources management; geostatistics; stochastic analysis; numerical modeling. Projects: groundwater quality impacts from confined animal facilities; nitrogen fluxes in a deep heterogeneous vadose zone; transport of Cryptosporidium parvum in unconsolidated sediments; stochastic analysis of salinity migration in deep aquifer systems; conjunctive management of surface water and groundwater resources; fate and transport of emerging contaminants.
Matt J. Hengel
Asst. Adjunct Professor
Laboratory Coordinator IR-4 Western Region and Trace Analytical Laboratory
Department of Environmental Toxicology
4419 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-2402
Website
Develop new and modify existing analytical methods for the determination of pesticides in the environment. These include, but are not limited to: fruits, vegetables, nuts, grains, water, air and soil matrixes. Our primary analytical tools are gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometers (GC-MS and LC-MS/MS).
Peter J. Hernes
Associate Professor
Land, Air and Water Resources- Hydrology
One Shields Ave
Davis, CA 95616-8628
129 Veihmeyer Hall
(530) 754-43277
Website
Aqueous organic geochemistry, molecular methods development, carbon cycling, river biogeochemistry, tannin diagenesis, photochemistry and transport of lignin/terrigenous organic matter, mineral protection and interaction with organic matter, dissolved/particulate interactions.
Dirk M. Holstege
Adjunct Professor
Director, DANR Analytical Laboratory
207 Hoagland Hall
(530) 752-0148
Website 1
Website 2
Development of analytical methodologies for chemical analysis in soil, plant tissue, biological materials, and water. Analysis for naturally-occurring toxins of plant origin. Trace metal analysis and trace organic analysis. Application of LC/MS/MS for trace analysis.
William R. Horwath
Professor
Soils and Biogeochemistry
3226 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building
(530) 754-6029
Website
Stable and radioactive isotope studies in humic chemistry and microbial biomass dynamics, carbon sequestration in managed and natural ecosystems, influence of sustainable agriculture practices on long-term soil fertility and water quality, sources of nitrate in ecosystems, denitrification, root turnover and plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere.
Norman Y. Kado
Associate Adjunct Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4336 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-2457
Website
Bioassay and chemical analysis of environmental complex mixtures; analysis of airborne particle and vapor-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Occupational and environmental exposure and biological monitoring of airborne toxicants.
Michael Kleeman
Professor
Civil and Environmental Engineering
3125 Engineering III
(530) 752-8386
Website
Professor Kleeman’s research is focused on the study of urban and regional air quality problems with an emphasis on the size and composition of atmospheric particles and gas-to-particle conversion processes. These issues are important because research has found that airborne particles with diameters less than 2.5 microns cause adverse health effects. The size and composition of particles found in the atmosphere also determines much of the visibility reduction observed in large cities.
John P. Knezovich
Adjunct Professor
Department of Environmental Toxicology
4239 Meyer HallPhone: 925-422-0925
Website
The environmental fate and toxicity of organic contaminants, heavy metals, and radionuclides. Emphasis on the application of ion-beam analytical techniques to assess the bioavailability of contaminants and their in vivo disposition. Use of accelerator mass spectrometry to assess the fate of low-doses (i.e., environmental concentrations) of contaminants through the application of isotopic tracers.
Douglas M. Mackay
Adjunct Professor
Land Air and Water Resources
650-400-3998
Website
Laboratory and field studies of transport and fate of chemical contaminants and their transformation products in the vadose and saturated zones. Groundwater remediation technologies, including field pilot testing and approaches for performance assessment. Methods for estimating total mass discharge of, and thus risk presented by, contaminants flowing in groundwater or migrating through the vadose zone. Methods for release and mixing of solutes (remediation, amendments, tracers) into groundwater. Performance and use of conservative tracers and tracers with other abilities (e.g. detecting presence of non-aqueous phase liquids, a.k.a. NAPLs). Secondary impacts of groundwater remediation. Factors limiting natural attenuation of organic contaminants in the vadose and saturated zones, including crude oil, refined petroleum products, ethanol-blended gasoline, gasoline oxygenates, pesticides, and halogenated solvents.
Frank Mitloehner

Associate Professor

Department of Animal Science
2151 Meyer Hall
(530)-752-3936
Website
Current research in air quality related to livestock production, especially quantification of ammonia, dust, and odor emissions in dairies, beef feedlots, and poultry operations. Main objective is to help establish environmentally benign livestock systems. Current research also in environmental physiology, focusing on effects of air emissions on animal health and welfare.
Alexandra Navrotsky
Professor of Chemistry
Department of Chemistry
440 Chemistry Annex
(530) 752-3292
Website
Dr. Navrotsky’s research interests lie at the intersection of solid state chemistry, geochemistry, and materials science.
Tran B. Nguyen
Assistant Professor
Department of Environmental Toxicology
4113 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-5987
Website
Dr. Nguyen’s research investigates how atmospheric chemistry governs the composition and properties of air pollutant mixtures, such as their radiative effects on climate and toxicological effects on human health. A primary goal is to understand the oxidation mechanisms occurring in the gas phase, aerosol particles, and fog/cloud droplets. Ultimately, these mechanisms will be integrated into computational models used to simulate the atmosphere.
Sanjai J. Parikh
Associate Professor
Land Air and Water Resources
3230 Plant and Environmental Sciences
(530)752-1265
Website
Investigating how interactions between bacteria, minerals, humic substances, and contaminants in natural environments influence biogeochemical cycling and environmental quality. Examples of my research interests include: (1) determining reaction rates of contaminant oxidation/transformation at mineral and bacteria surfaces; (2) studying the fate, transport, and reactivity of agricultural antibiotics in soils located near concentrated animal feeding operations; (3) elucidating the role of bacterial surface biomolecules in cell adhesion and biomineralization/dissolution reactions; (4) investigating the role of extracellular polymeric compounds in heavy metal biogeocycling; and (5) identifying persistent degradation products of primary pollutants and determining their bioavailability.
Ron C. Runnebaum
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Viticulture and Enology, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
Office: 3160 RMI North
Phone: (530)-752-9078
Dr. Runnebaum’s research has focused on catalytic conversion of biomass-derived compounds to biofuels, elucidating structure-reactivity relationships in delaminated zeolites, and catalyst design and synthesis.
Randall J. Southard

Professor

Soil Science and Genesis/Morphology
Divisional Associate Dean for Environmental Sciences
2148 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building
(530) 752-7041
Website
Soil genesis, morphology, and classification; soil-geomorphic relations; soil mineralogy; agricultural dust and PM-10.
Ronald Tjeerdema
Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4245 Meyer Hall
Phone: (530) 754-5912
Website
Research currently focused on investigating (1) the metabolic actions of toxic chemicals in aquatic animals using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics (environmental metabolomics); (2) the biochemical actions of toxic chemicals in aquatic animals using in vivo NMR; (3) the kinetics and biotransformation of pesticides and petroleum hydrocarbons in aquatic animals; (4) the influence of surfactants on the bioavailability of petroleum hydrocarbons in aquatic systems; (5) the dissipation of herbicides via volatilization, soil sorption, photodegradation and microbial degradation under rice field conditions; and (6) the fate of pesticides and petroleum hydrocarbons in marine mussels and sediments. Member of the Graduate Groups in Agricultural & Environmental Chemistry, Ecology, and Pharmacology & Toxicology.
Jean S. Vandergheynst
Professor
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering
3040 Bainer Hall
(530) 752-0989
Website
Dr. VanderGheynst’s research involves investigating a diverse array of biological systems to address relevant problems in fields such as plant biotechnology, biofuels, and pest management. Many of the biological systems under investigation involve a variety of microbes and plant tissues. Aims of current projects include improving the storage and pretreatment of biomass for biofuel production, investigating microalgae as a feedstock for biofuels, improving the efficiency of genetic transformation in plant expression systems, and formulating microbes for long term stability. Educating the public and training future biological systems engineers are important components of her research activities.
Spencer Walse
Research Chemist
USDA Agricultural Research Service
Website
Current efforts focused on solving chemically-based problems in agriculture. Research activities involve the development and integration of predictive chemical kinetics, modeling strategies and field/in situ results as they relate to quantitatively understanding the interaction of molecules with their surroundings. He investigates molecules that are produced naturally as well as those that are produced by humans.
Selina Wang
Assistant Adjunct Professor
UC Davis Olive Center
Phone: (530) 752-0612
Website
Current research interests include purity and quality, chemistry and sensory correlation, byproduct management, harvesting and processing advancement, and analytical method developments for olives and olive oil. Dr. Wang is interested in many aspects of food science and chemistry using olives and olive oil as study cases.
Thomas Young
Professor
Civil & Environmental Engineering
3113 Ghausi
Phone: (530) 754-9399
Website
Physical/chemical methods of soil and groundwater treatment, green chemistry, fate, transport, transformation and effects of environmental contaminants, sorption/desorption processes in soils and sediments, relationship between natural organic matter structure and sorption reactivity.
Qi Zhang
Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4251A Meyer Hall
Phone: (530) 752-5779
Website
Current research centers on the characterization, production, and environmental fates of atmospheric condensed phase pollutants and their impacts on climate and human health. Research topics include: aerosol mass spectrometry, data analysis and interpretation, and studies of fog and cloud chemistry

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BTC Faculty

Name Contact Info Research Interests
Deborah H. Bennett
Associate Professor
Environmental and Occupational Health
Department of Public Health Sciences
One Shields Ave, TB 169
(530) 754-8282
Website
Research interests focus on the fate, transport, and exposure to chemicals in a multimedia environment within the context of environmental risk assessment.
Andrew J. Clifford
Professor Emeritus
Nutrition
3147 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-3376
Website
Dynamics of nutrient metabolism in vivo in humans. Nutrients of special interest include folic acid, vitamin A, carotenes and phytonutrients. Research involves synthesis of nutrients tagged with deuterium, carbon-14 and/or carbon-13, administering the tagged nutrients (or intrinsically labeled foods) to human volunteers and determining the metabolic fate of the nutrients. Analytic methods used include HPLC, GC, MS, MSMS, AMS, HPLC-MS and GC-MS. physiologic compartmental models (mathematical simulations) are constructed from nutrient isotopomer ratios in tissues by time since dosing to describe the dynamics of nutrient metabolism.
Carroll E. Cross
Professor
Pulmonary and Critical Care
UC Davis Medical Group – Sacramento
(916) 734-3564
Website
Inhalation toxicology; studies of oxidant injury in biological systems, particularly in regards to antioxidant protection systems, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation.
Anthony J. Cornel
Assistant Entomologist
Kearney Ag. Center
(559) 646-6556
Website
Genomic studies on mosquitoes of medical importance. Particular emphasis on insecticide resistance genes and Anopheles polytene chromosome physical mapping.
Michael Denison
Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4241 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-3879
Webstie
Molecular mechanisms of action of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons; Structure and function of receptors for xenobiotics and hormones; Molecular mechanisms of constitutive and inducible gene expression; Molecular approaches to development of toxicant of toxicant bioassay systems.
Oliver Fiehn
Professor
UC Davis Genome Center
1315 GBSF
(530) 754-8258
Website
The Fiehn research laboratory develops and uses mass spectrometry and cheminformatics to utilize metabolomic data in food, algae and agricultural research. These tools are employed to understant which parts of larger biochemical networks respond to genetic perturbation or environmental stress. Examples of current and past AgChem prodjects are ‘wine quality’, ‘algae biofuels’, and ‘seed germination’.
Bruce D. Hammock
Professor
Entomology
90 Briggs Hall
(530) 752-7519
Website
Development of pharmaceuticals bvased on modulation of arachidonate cascade; metabolomic evaluation of omega 3 and 6 regulatory lipids and steroids; comparative drug and pesticide metabolism; development of immunoassays based on cloned antibodies and optical transduction.
Norman Y. Kado
Associate Adjunct Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4336 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-2457
Website
Bioassay and chemical analysis of environmental complex mixtures; analysis of airborne particle and vapor-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Occupational and environmental exposure and biological monitoring of airborne toxicants.
Annie J. King
Professor
Animal Science
Associate Dean, CAES
150 Mrak Hall
(530) 752-7150
Website
Prevention of lipid oxidation in poultry muscle, eggs and their products; methodologies for determination of cholesterol and its oxidized derivatives in poultry muscle and eggs.
Walter S. Leal
Professor
Entomology
308D Briggs Hall
(530) 752-7755
Website
Molecular basis of the highly selective and sensitive insect olfactory system, in particular, the mechanism(s) involving the fast transport (and inactivation) of airborne odor molecules (pheromones and other semiochemicals) through the aqueous environment of the olfactory sensillum surrounding the olfactory receptors. Isolation, identification, and cloning of the genes encoding odorant-binding proteins and odorant-degrading enzymes and expression of proteins for structural and biophysical studies of pheromone perception. Also, I am interested in isolation, identification, and synthesis of insect pheromones and other semiochemicals.
Carlito Lebrilla
Professor
Department of Chemistry
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine
2645 Chemistry Annex
(530) 753-2830
Website
Analylsis of glycoconjugates including free oligosaccharides, glycoproteins and glycolipids in human fluid. Discovery of biomarkers for diseases including cancer and infection. Determination of components of human milk. Development of massspectrometry and liquid separation devices and methods for analysis.
Charlie Li
Assistant Adjunct Professor
Environmental Toxicology
(510) 307-6221
Website
Food chemistry; food biochemistry; environmental chemistry, and food analysis. Current research focuses on qualitative and quantitative analysis of toxic chemicals present in foods.
Krishnan P. Nambiar
Associate Professor
Bio-organic Chemistry
(530) 752-4757
Website
Our research focuses on understanding the chemical interactions involved in macromolecular recognition relevant to biological systems and the utilization of the resulting information in the design of novel molecules with chemical and biological applications.
John W. Newman
Adjunct Faculty
USDA-ARS-WHNRC Scientist
Department of Nutrition
210 WHNRC / 1283O Academic Surge
(530) 752-1009/(530) 754-4427
Website
Exploring the interactions of dietary lipids, lipid transport and metabolism as they pertain to obesity and complications of obesity, including chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease.
Sanjai J. Parikh
Associate Professor
Land Air and Water Resources
3230 Plant and Environmental Sciences
(530)752-1265
Website
Investigating how interactions between bacteria, minerals, humic substances, and contaminants in natural environments influence biogeochemical cycling and environmental quality. Examples of my research interests include: (1) determining reaction rates of contaminant oxidation/transformation at mineral and bacteria surfaces; (2) studying the fate, transport, and reactivity of agricultural antibiotics in soils located near concentrated animal feeding operations; (3) elucidating the role of bacterial surface biomolecules in cell adhesion and biomineralization/dissolution reactions; (4) investigating the role of extracellular polymeric compounds in heavy metal biogeocycling; and (5) identifying persistent degradation products of primary pollutants and determining their bioavailability.
James R. Sanborn
Associate Research Scientist
Entomology
(530) 752-8465
Fax: (530) 752-1537
Website
Development of occupational and non-occupational pesticide exposure assessment for humans; synthesis of haptens for immunoassays.
Taka Shibamoto
Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4115 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-4523
Website
Genotoxicity study of food constituents. Chemistry and physiology of flavors and fragrance. Mutagens and carcinogens occurring during heat treatment of foods. Role of lipid perixidation in aging, carcinogenesis, and mutagenesis. Fate of pesticides in the environment.
Gary M. Smith
Professor
Food Science and Chemistry
Director, UCD NMR Facility
112 Food Sci & Tech
(530) 752-6168
Website
Mechanisms of enzyme action, heme proteins, microbial adaptation to chill and osmotic stress, nuclear magnetic resonance, dairy chemistry. (biochemistry)
Dean J. Tantillo
Professor
Theoretical Organic Chemistry
Chemistry 316
(530) 754-5635
Website
Theoretical studies of bio-organic reaction mechanisms. Our research is driven by intriguing mechanistic questions and spans many areas of organic chemistry. These include enzyme catalyzed reactions, reactive intermediate promoted polycyclization (RIPP) reactions, catalyst design, physical organometallic chemistry, carbocation structures and rearrangements, pericyclic reactions, regio- and stereoselectivity of synthetically useful reactions, aromaticity, organic chemistry on metal surfaces, computational functional genomics, and computer-aided design of enzyme inhibitors.
Swee J. Teh
Associate Researcher
Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Biology
1203 Haring Hall
School of Veterinary Medicine
(530) 754-8183
Website
Research emphasis on adverse effects in the growth, reproduction and embryonic development in invertebrate, fish and shellfish populations caused by environmental endocrine disruptors and contaminants.
Ron S. Tjeerdema
Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4245 Meyer Hall
(530) 754-5912
Website
Research currently focused on investigating (1) the metabolic actions of toxic chemicals in aquatic animals using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics (environmental metabolomics); (2) the biochemical actions of toxic chemicals in aquatic animals using in vivo NMR; (3) the kinetics and biotransformation of pesticides and petroleum hydrocarbons in aquatic animals; (4) the influence of surfactants on the bioavailability of petroleum hydrocarbons in aquatic systems; (5) the dissipation of herbicides via volatilization, soil sorption, photodegradation and microbial degradation under rice field conditions; and (6) the fate of pesticides and petroleum hydrocarbons in marine mussels and sediments. Member of the Graduate Groups in Agricultural & Environmental Chemistry, Ecology, and Pharmacology & Toxicology.
Jean S. Vandergheynst
Professor
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering
3040 Bainer Hall
(530) 752-0989
Website
Dr. VanderGheynst’s research involves investigating a diverse array of biological systems to address relevant problems in fields such as plant biotechnology, biofuels, and pest management. Many of the biological systems under investigation involve a variety of microbes and plant tissues. Aims of current projects include improving the storage and pretreatment of biomass for biofuel production, investigating microalgae as a feedstock for biofuels, improving the efficiency of genetic transformation in plant expression systems, and formulating microbes for long term stability. Educating the public and training future biological systems engineers are important components of her research activities.
Matthew J. Wood
Associate Professor
Environmental Toxicology
Office: Meyer Hall 4247
Lab: Meyer Hall 4330
(530) 754-2271
Environmental Gene Regulation, Oxidative Stress
Website
My research group is focused on defining the biochemical mechanisms involved in the perception of and protection against oxidative stress and other toxic compounds using the model organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Oxidative stress is caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals and has been implicated in several degenerative diseases and the aging process. Reactive oxygen species can result from incomplete reduction of molecular oxygen and exposure to radiation or toxic chemicals found in the environment. To defend against oxidative stress, organisms have evolved specific signal transduction pathways that result in the increased transcription of genes involved in detoxification and protection against reactive oxygen species. By defining the molecular mechanisms by which oxidative and environmental stresses alter cellular signaling pathways and gene expression, my research group hopes to develop new technologies for monitoring and remediation of environmental toxicants. In line with the broad scope of my laboratory, we use a variety of approaches to characterize the structure and function of proteins as well as cell and molecular biology, yeast genetics and genome-wide approaches.

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FWC Faculty

Name Contact Info Research Interests
Diane M. Barrett
Fruit and Vegetable Products Specialist
Food Science & Technology
114 Food Sci & Tech
(530) 752-4800
Website
Fruit and vegetable quality, as affected by handling, storage, and processing conditions. Focus on thermal processing, freezing, and dehydration and the role of enzymes in fruit and vegetable flavor, color, and texture.
Linda F. Bisson
Professor & Geneticist
Viticulture and Enology
Maynard A. Amerine Endowed Chair in Viticulture and Enology
3011 Wickson Hall
(530) 752-3835
Website
Nutrient sensing in yeast: glucose utilization, detection, signal transduction and rate of glycolytic flux. Analysis of causes of fermentation arrest in yeast. Proteome analysis of global gene expression in Saccharomyces in the natural environment. Off-character production during fermentation of grape juice. Investigation of chemical instability in wines.
Roger Boulton
Professor & Chemical Engineer
Viticulture and Enology
Stephen Sinclair Scott Endowed Chair in Enology
1005 Wickson Hall
(530) 752-0900
Website
Chemical engineering aspects of wine processing. Mathematical modeling of enological operations. Color chemistry and copigmentation in red wines.
Susan Ebeler
Associate Professor and Chemist
Viticulture and Enology
AgChem Graduate Group Chairperson
103 Enology Building
(530) 752-0696
Website
Flavor chemistry and analysis; interaction of flavors with other (non-volatile) food/beverage components. Correlation of instrumental and sensory methods of flavor analysis. Health effects of wine; development of analytical methodologies for analysis of wine components.
Oliver Fiehn
Associate Professor
UC Davis Genome Center
1315 GBSF
(530) 754-8258
Website
The Fiehn research laboratory develops improved methods in analytical chemistry and bioinformatics to capture and utilize metabolomic data. These tools are employed to understand, which parts of larger biochemical networks respond to genetic perturbation or environmental stress.
Edwin Frankel
Adjunct Professor
Food Science and Technology
207 Food Sci & Tech
(530) 752-4478
Website
Lipid oxidation; food and biological antioxidants; lipid chemistry and technology; lipid peroxidation in biological systems; phytochemical antioxidants in wine, fruit, spices, and beverages; low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation.
J. Bruce German
Professor
Food Science and Technology
John E. Kinsella Endowed Chair in Food Nutrition & Health
212 Food Sci & Tech
(530) 752-1486
Website
Chemistry and biochemistry of lipids, the role of dietary fat on tissue and cell function, essential fatty acid metabolism and synthesis of bioactive metabolites, enzymology of lipid oxidation.
Matt J. Hengel
Asst. Adjunct Professor
Laboratory Coordinator IR-4 Western Region and Trace Analytical Laboratory
Department of Environmental Toxicology
4419 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-2402
Website
Develop new and modify existing analytical methods for the determination of pesticides in the environment. These include, but are not limited to: fruits, vegetables, nuts, grains, water, air and soil matrixes. Our primary analytical tools are gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometers (GC-MS and LC-MS/MS).
Hildegarde Heymann
Professor
Viticulture & Enology
3009 Wickson Hall
(530) 754-4816
Website
Sensory analysis of wines
John W. Newman
Associate Adjunct Professor
USDA-ARS-WHNRC Scientist
Department of Nutrition
210 WHNRC / 1283O Academic Surge
(530) 752-1009/(530) 754-4427
Website
Exploring the interactions of dietary lipids, lipid transport and metabolism as they pertain to obesity and complications of obesity, including chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease.
Michael J. McCarthy
Professor
Department of Food Science and Technology
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering
231 Cruess Hall
(530) 752-2358
Website
Food engineering, mathematical modeling of mass heat transfer during food processing, mixing of non-Newtonian fluids, development of process analytical sensors, process control, nuclear magnetic resonance and development of MRI procedures for process analysis.
Alyson E. Mitchell
Assistant Professor
Food Science and Technology
106 Food Sci & Tech
(530) 752-7926
Website
Food chemistry and toxicology; impact of dietary exposures on metabolism; application of LC/MS to isolate and identify bioactive food constituents.
Neil Schore
Professor
Organic Chemistry
320 Chemistry Bldg
(530) 752-6263
Website
Mechanistic and synthetic organic and organometallic chemistry; applications of organometallic chemistry and polymer chemistry to synthesis.
Taka Shibamoto
Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4115 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-4523
Website
Genotoxicity study of food constituents. Chemistry and physiology of flavors and fragrance. Mutagens and carcinogens occurring during heat treatment of foods. Role of lipid perixidation in aging, carcinogenesis, and mutagenesis. Fate of pesticides in the environment.
Charles Shoemaker
Professor
Food Science and Technology
127 Cruess Hall
(530) 752-8079
Website
Food rheology; interfacial phenomena in food systems; microcomputer technology in food analysis and process control. (physical chemistry)
Gary M. Smith
Professor
Food Science and Chemistry
Director, UCD NMR Facility
112 Food Sci & Tech
(530) 752-6168
Website
Mechanisms of enzyme action, heme proteins, microbial adaptation to chill and osmotic stress, nuclear magnetic resonance, dairy chemistry. (biochemistry)
Jean S. Vandergheynst
Professor
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering
3040 Bainer Hall
(530) 752-0989
Website
Dr. VanderGheynst’s research involves investigating a diverse array of biological systems to address relevant problems in fields such as plant biotechnology, biofuels, and pest management. Many of the biological systems under investigation involve a variety of microbes and plant tissues. Aims of current projects include improving the storage and pretreatment of biomass for biofuel production, investigating microalgae as a feedstock for biofuels, improving the efficiency of genetic transformation in plant expression systems, and formulating microbes for long term stability. Educating the public and training future biological systems engineers are important components of her research activities.
Andrew L. Waterhouse
Professor
Viticulture and Enology
2015 Wickson Hall
(530) 752-4777
Website
We study wine oxidation reaction mechanisms in order to give winemakers better tools to manage the process and achieve their desired wine style. We also investigate the polyphenolics substances in grapes and wine, their effect on wine color and taste, and the effects of wine processing on their composition. We also address the chemical analysis of wine components that become important with regard to our research questions, and we continue to investigate the health effects of phenolic stubstances

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FPC Faculty

Name Contact Info Research Interests
You-Lo Hsieh
Professor
227 Everson Hall
(530) 752-0843
Fax: (530) 752-7584
http://textiles.ucdavis.edu/
Biobased nanofibers and functional materials: polysaccharides (cellulose, chitin, chitosan, nanofibers and nanocrystals and derivatives), proteins and polyphenolics; encapsulation and delivery of biocatalysts and bacteriophages; enzyme catalyzed reactions and modification of polymers; carbon and ceramic porous nanomaterials.
Gang Sun
Associate Professor
235 Everson Hall
(530) 752-0840
Fax: (530) 752-7584
http://textiles.ucdavis.edu/sungroup/index.html
Functional modifications of polymers and textile materials, synthesis of new functional monomers and new polymers, property-structural study of polymer materials, antimicrobial and anti-chemical materials, utilization of agricultural wastes in textile processing.

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