Home » Agricultural and Environmental Chemistry Faculty

Coursework Checklists – 2019 Requirements

          MS Plan I (Thesis)
          Ph.D.

Coursework Checklists – 2007 Requirements

         MS Plan I (Thesis)
         Ph.D.

Contact Us:

Agricultural & Environmental Chemistry Graduate Group

One Shields Avenue

Davis, CA 95616

etoxgradadvising@ucdavis.edu

Agricultural and Environmental Chemistry Faculty

By Discipline:

Environmental & Analytical Chemistry

Biological & Toxicological Chemistry

Food & Wine Chemistry

Fiber & Polymer Chemistry

 

Faculty in the Area of Environmental and Analytical Chemistry

Name Contact Information Research Interests
Cort Anastasio
Group Chair, Professor
Atmospheric Science Program
3146 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building
(530) 754-6095
Website

Environmental chemistry; chemistry and photochemistry of tropospheric cloud and fog drops and aerosol particles; interactions between these condensed phases and the gas phase.

Deborah H. Bennett
Associate Professor
Environmental and Occupational Health
Department of Public Health Sciences
One Shields Ave, TB 169
(530) 754-8282
Website

Research interests focus on the fate, transport, and exposure to chemicals in both indoors and multimedia environments within the context of environmental epidemiology and risk assessment.

Christopher Cappa
Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
3135 Ghausi Hall
530-752-8180
Website

Research in the Cappa group focuses on developing and understanding the links between chemical, physical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on urban air quality and global climate through laboratory experiments and field observations.

Ian C. Faloona
Professor
Land Air and Water Resources
3138 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building
Phone: (530) 752-2044
Website
Ian’s research is based on an interdisciplinary, observational approach that  encompasses three principal areas: atmospheric chemistry, biogeochemistry, and the turbulent dynamics of planetary boundary layers. His group strives in particular to bridge the fields of micrometeorology and chemistry in the atmosphere and ocean. Scientific experimentation takes place on aircraft, ocean vessels, towers using a wide array of optical and mass spectrometric analytical techniques.
Peter G. Green
Associate Research Engineer
Civil and Environmental Engineering
2021 Ghausi Hall
(530) 752-8581
Website

Water quality, air quality, trace metal analysis, trace organic analysis, water resources.

Bradley D. Hanson
Cooperative Extension Weed Science Specialist
Plant Sciences
276 Robbins Hall
(530) 752-8115
Website

Hanson’s research and extension program is focused on management of weeds in agricultural production systems with the goal of increasing economic and environmental sustainability of annual and perennial cropping systems.  This work includes both applied and basic research approaches to integrated pest management solutions for weeds and other pests using a variety of chemical and non-chemical approaches. Much of our current research is focused on herbicide issues including: weed control efficacy, herbicide-resistant weeds, herbicide fate in soil, and crop injury resulting from herbicide drift or other routes of exposure.

Thomas Harter
Hydrological Sciences Specialist
Hydrological Sciences
125 Veihmeyer Hall
(530) 752-2709
Website

Flow and transport processes in groundwater and in the vadose zone; non-point source pollution of groundwater; groundwater remediation; groundwater resources management; geostatistics; stochastic analysis; numerical modeling. Projects: groundwater quality impacts from confined animal facilities; nitrogen fluxes in a deep heterogeneous vadose zone; transport of Cryptosporidium parvum in unconsolidated sediments; stochastic analysis of salinity migration in deep aquifer systems; conjunctive management of surface water and groundwater resources; fate and transport of emerging contaminants.

Matt J. Hengel
Adjunct Professor
Laboratory Coordinator IR-4 Western Region and Trace Analytical Laboratory
Department of Environmental Toxicology
208A Sprocket Building
(530) 752-2402
Website

Develop new and modify existing analytical methods for the determination of pesticides in the environment. These include, but are not limited to: fruits, vegetables, nuts, grains, water, air and soil matrixes. Our primary analytical tools are gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometers (GC-MS and LC-MS/MS).

Peter J. Hernes
Associate Professor
Land, Air and Water Resources – Hydrology
129 Veihmeyer Hall
(530) 754-43277
Website

Aqueous organic geochemistry, molecular methods development, carbon cycling, river biogeochemistry, tannin diagenesis, photochemistry and transport of lignin/terrigenous organic matter, mineral protection and interaction with organic matter, dissolved/particulate interactions.

William R. Horwath
Professor
Soils and Biogeochemistry
3226 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building
(530) 754-6029
Website

Stable and radioactive isotope studies in humic chemistry and microbial biomass dynamics, carbon sequestration in managed and natural ecosystems, influence of sustainable agriculture practices on long-term soil fertility and water quality, sources of nitrate in ecosystems, denitrification, root turnover and plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere.

Norman Y. Kado
Associate Adjunct Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4336 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-2457
Website

Bioassay and chemical analysis of environmental complex mixtures; analysis of airborne particle and vapor-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Occupational and environmental exposure and biological monitoring of airborne toxicants.

Michael Kleeman
Professor
Civil and Environmental Engineering
3125 Engineering III
(530) 752-8386
Website

Professor Kleeman’s research is focused on the study of urban and regional air quality problems with an emphasis on the size and composition of atmospheric particles and gas-to-particle conversion processes. These issues are important because research has found that airborne particles with diameters less than 2.5 microns cause adverse health effects. The size and composition of particles found in the atmosphere also determines much of the visibility reduction observed in large cities.

Mark Mascal
Professor
Department of Chemistry
306 Chemistry
(530) 754-5373
Website

The main theme of our research program is the application of synthetic organic chemistry to the study of sustainable energy and materials, molecular electronics, medicinal chemistry, and fundamental aspects of molecular structure. Current work is focused in five main areas: (1) chemical conversion of biomass into organic molecules of interest as fuels, polymers, and value-added products; (2) concise natural product synthesis; (3) design and synthesis of topologically interesting organic molecules; (4) design and synthesis of novel p-type dopants for organic semiconductors; (5) synthesis and evaluation of small organic molecules for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and other beneficial health effects.

Frank Mitloehner
Associate Professor
Department of Animal Science
2151 Meyer Hall
(530)-752-3936
Website

Current research in air quality related to livestock production, especially quantification of ammonia, dust, and odor emissions in dairies, beef feedlots, and poultry operations. Main objective is to help establish environmentally benign livestock systems. Current research also in environmental physiology, focusing on effects of air emissions on animal health and welfare.

Sascha C.T. Nicklisch
Assistant Professor
Department of Environmental Toxicology
4117 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-1415
Website

The Nicklisch Lab is interested in understanding how and to what extent environmental chemicals can enter and accumulate in humans and other organisms. Our main focus is on studying how different types of transport proteins interact with these chemicals and if we can test for and design more “green” chemicals that are better eliminated. The lab has a traditional protein biochemistry format with some mild flavors of molecular biology and analytical chemistry.

Tran B. Nguyen
Assistant Professor
Department of Environmental Toxicology
4113 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-5987
Website

Dr. Nguyen’s research investigates how atmospheric chemistry governs the composition and properties of air pollutant mixtures, such as their radiative effects on climate and toxicological effects on human health. A primary goal is to understand the oxidation mechanisms occurring in the gas phase, aerosol particles, and fog/cloud droplets. Ultimately, these mechanisms will be integrated into computational models used to simulate the atmosphere.

Sanjai J. Parikh
Associate Professor
Land Air and Water Resources
3230 Plant and Environmental Sciences
(530)752-1265
Website

Investigating how interactions between bacteria, minerals, humic substances, and contaminants in natural environments influence biogeochemical cycling and environmental quality. Examples of my research interests include: (1) determining reaction rates of contaminant oxidation/transformation at mineral and bacteria surfaces; (2) studying the fate, transport, and reactivity of agricultural antibiotics in soils located near concentrated animal feeding operations; (3) elucidating the role of bacterial surface biomolecules in cell adhesion and biomineralization/dissolution reactions; (4) investigating the role of extracellular polymeric compounds in heavy metal biogeocycling; and (5) identifying persistent degradation products of primary pollutants and determining their bioavailability.

Brett A. Poulin
Assistant Professor
Department of Environmental Toxicology

4145 Meyer Hall

(530) 754-2454

Website

The Poulin Lab is interested in the environmental chemistry and toxicology of metal contaminants in the environments, with an emphasis on mercury. At the field scale, our research aims to identify the key processes controlling the transformations of mercury in managed aquatic systems (e.g., wetlands, reservoirs); this information informs system management to decrease methylmercury exposure at the organism level. Other research interests include (1) interactions between dissolved organic matter and natural and engineered nanoparticles, (2) organic sulfur chemistry, and (3) mechanisms of metal detoxification in organisms.

Ron C. Runnebaum
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Viticulture and Enology, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
Office: 3160 RMI North
Phone: (530)-752-9078

Dr. Runnebaum’s research has focused on catalytic conversion of biomass-derived compounds to biofuels, elucidating structure-reactivity relationships in delaminated zeolites, and catalyst design and synthesis.

Ronald Tjeerdema
Professor/ Associate Dean
Environmental Toxicology
4245 Meyer Hall
Phone: (530) 754-5912
Website

Research currently focused on investigating (1) the metabolic actions of toxic chemicals in aquatic animals using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics (environmental metabolomics); (2) the biochemical actions of toxic chemicals in aquatic animals using in vivo NMR; (3) the kinetics and biotransformation of pesticides and petroleum hydrocarbons in aquatic animals; (4) the influence of surfactants on the bioavailability of petroleum hydrocarbons in aquatic systems; (5) the dissipation of herbicides via volatilization, soil sorption, photodegradation and microbial degradation under rice field conditions; and (6) the fate of pesticides and petroleum hydrocarbons in marine mussels and sediments. Member of the Graduate Groups in Agricultural & Environmental Chemistry, Ecology, and Pharmacology & Toxicology.

Spencer Walse
Research Chemist
USDA Agricultural Research Service

Current efforts focused on solving chemically-based problems in agriculture. Research activities involve the development and integration of predictive chemical kinetics, modeling strategies and field/in situ results as they relate to quantitatively understanding the interaction of molecules with their surroundings. He investigates molecules that are produced naturally as well as those that are produced by humans.

Thomas Young
Professor
Civil & Environmental Engineering
3113 Ghausi
Phone: (530) 754-9399
Website

Physical/chemical methods of soil and groundwater treatment, green chemistry, fate, transport, transformation and effects of environmental contaminants, sorption/desorption processes in soils and sediments, relationship between natural organic matter structure and sorption reactivity.

Qi Zhang
Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4251A Meyer Hall
Phone: (530) 752-5779
Website

Current research centers on the characterization, production, and environmental fates of atmospheric condensed phase pollutants and their impacts on climate and human health. Research topics include: aerosol mass spectrometry, data analysis and interpretation, and studies of fog and cloud chemistry

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Faculty in the Area of Biological and Toxicological Chemistry

Name Contact Info Research Interests
Deborah H. Bennett
Associate Professor
Environmental and Occupational Health
Department of Public Health Sciences
One Shields Ave, TB 169
(530) 754-8282
Website

Research interests focus on the fate, transport, and exposure to chemicals in a multimedia environment within the context of environmental risk assessment.

Anthony J. Cornel
Assistant Entomologist
Kearney Ag. Center
(559) 646-6556
Website

Genomic studies on mosquitoes of medical importance. Particular emphasis on insecticide resistance genes and Anopheles polytene chromosome physical mapping.

Oliver Fiehn
Professor
UC Davis Genome Center
1315 GBSF
(530) 754-8258
Website

The Fiehn research laboratory develops and uses mass spectrometry and cheminformatics to utilize metabolomic data in food, algae and agricultural research. These tools are employed to understant which parts of larger biochemical networks respond to genetic perturbation or environmental stress. Examples of current and past AgChem prodjects are ‘wine quality’, ‘algae biofuels’, and ‘seed germination’.

Bruce D. Hammock
Professor
Entomology
90 Briggs Hall
(530) 752-7519
Website

Development of pharmaceuticals based on modulation of arachidonate cascade; metabolomic evaluation of omega 3 and 6 regulatory lipids and steroids; comparative drug and pesticide metabolism; development of immunoassays based on cloned antibodies and optical transduction.

Norman Y. Kado
Associate Adjunct Professor
Environmental Toxicology
4336 Meyer Hall
(530) 752-2457
Website

Bioassay and chemical analysis of environmental complex mixtures; analysis of airborne particle and vapor-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Occupational and environmental exposure and biological monitoring of airborne toxicants.

Annie J. King
Professor
Animal Science
Associate Dean, CAES
150 Mrak Hall
(530) 752-7150
Website

Prevention of lipid oxidation in poultry muscle, eggs and their products; methodologies for determination of cholesterol and its oxidized derivatives in poultry muscle and eggs.

Walter S. Leal
Professor
Entomology
308D Briggs Hall
(530) 752-7755
Website

Molecular basis of the highly selective and sensitive insect olfactory system, in particular, the mechanism(s) involving the fast transport (and inactivation) of airborne odor molecules (pheromones and other semiochemicals) through the aqueous environment of the olfactory sensillum surrounding the olfactory receptors. Isolation, identification, and cloning of the genes encoding odorant-binding proteins and odorant-degrading enzymes and expression of proteins for structural and biophysical studies of pheromone perception. Also, I am interested in isolation, identification, and synthesis of insect pheromones and other semiochemicals.

Carlito Lebrilla
Professor
Department of Chemistry
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine
2645 Chemistry Annex
(530) 753-2830
Website

Analylsis of glycoconjugates including free oligosaccharides, glycoproteins and glycolipids in human fluid. Discovery of biomarkers for diseases including cancer and infection. Determination of components of human milk. Development of massspectrometry and liquid separation devices and methods for analysis.

Charlie Li
Assistant Adjunct Professor
Environmental Toxicology
(510) 307-6221
Website

Food chemistry; food biochemistry; environmental chemistry, and food analysis. Current research focuses on qualitative and quantitative analysis of toxic chemicals present in foods.

Gang-Yu Liu
Professor

Department of Chemistry 

(530)-754-9678 (office)

Website

Professor Liu’s research objective focuses on the development of nanotechnology and potential applications to bioanalytical chemistry. One important aspect of the research is the design and engineering of nanostructures which position bioreceptors and chemical reaction sites on surfaces with high precision.Current projects include: (1) development of state-of-the-art imaging tools for high-resolution imaging of ligands, DNA, proteins and cells; (2) advanced methodologies for production of arrays of nanostructures; (3) single-cell imaging and mechanics; (4) using nanostructures of antibodies produced to investigate hypersensitivity reaction or allergy; (5) using nanostructures of ligands for study of the initial HIV infection of human T-cells; and (6) using nanostructures of ligands for the investigation of cancer cell signaling.
Sanjai J. Parikh
Associate Professor
Land Air and Water Resources
3230 Plant and Environmental Sciences
(530)752-1265
Website

Investigating how interactions between bacteria, minerals, humic substances, and contaminants in natural environments influence biogeochemical cycling and environmental quality. Examples of my research interests include: (1) determining reaction rates of contaminant oxidation/transformation at mineral and bacteria surfaces; (2) studying the fate, transport, and reactivity of agricultural antibiotics in soils located near concentrated animal feeding operations; (3) elucidating the role of bacterial surface biomolecules in cell adhesion and biomineralization/dissolution reactions; (4) investigating the role of extracellular polymeric compounds in heavy metal biogeocycling; and (5) identifying persistent degradation products of primary pollutants and determining their bioavailability.

Dean J. Tantillo
Professor
Theoretical Organic Chemistry
Chemistry 316
(530) 754-5635
Website

Theoretical studies of bio-organic reaction mechanisms. Our research is driven by intriguing mechanistic questions and spans many areas of organic chemistry. These include enzyme catalyzed reactions, reactive intermediate promoted polycyclization (RIPP) reactions, catalyst design, physical organometallic chemistry, carbocation structures and rearrangements, pericyclic reactions, regio- and stereoselectivity of synthetically useful reactions, aromaticity, organic chemistry on metal surfaces, computational functional genomics, and computer-aided design of enzyme inhibitors.

Swee J. Teh
Professor
Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Biology
1203 Haring Hall
School of Veterinary Medicine
(530) 754-8183
Website

Research emphasis on adverse effects in the growth, reproduction and embryonic development in invertebrate, fish and shellfish populations caused by environmental endocrine disruptors and contaminants.

Ron S. Tjeerdema
Professor/Associate Dean
Environmental Toxicology
4245 Meyer Hall
(530) 754-5912
Website

Research currently focused on investigating (1) the metabolic actions of toxic chemicals in aquatic animals using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics (environmental metabolomics); (2) the biochemical actions of toxic chemicals in aquatic animals using in vivo NMR; (3) the kinetics and biotransformation of pesticides and petroleum hydrocarbons in aquatic animals; (4) the influence of surfactants on the bioavailability of petroleum hydrocarbons in aquatic systems; (5) the dissipation of herbicides via volatilization, soil sorption, photodegradation and microbial degradation under rice field conditions; and (6) the fate of pesticides and petroleum hydrocarbons in marine mussels and sediments. Member of the Graduate Groups in Agricultural & Environmental Chemistry, Ecology, and Pharmacology & Toxicology.

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Faculty in the Area of Food and Wine Chemistry

Name Contact Info Research Interests</th
Susan Ebeler
Professor
Viticulture and Enology
3148 RMI North Building/150 Mrak Hall
(530) 752-0696
Website

Research in my laboratory seeks to answer questions about food and beverage flavor, quality and health effects. We use analytical tools to study the effects of agricultural practices, fermentation, processing, and storage on composition of grapes, wines, and other foods and beverages. By linking compositional and sensory information, we can begin to understand how aroma compounds interact with each other and with food matrix components to contribute to complex food and beverage flavors.

Oliver Fiehn
Associate Professor
UC Davis Genome Center
1315 GBSF
(530) 754-8258
Website

The Fiehn research laboratory develops improved methods in analytical chemistry and bioinformatics to capture and utilize metabolomic data. These tools are employed to understand, which parts of larger biochemical networks respond to genetic perturbation or environmental stress.

J. Bruce German
Professor
Food Science and Technology
John E. Kinsella Endowed Chair in Food Nutrition & Health
212 Food Sci & Tech
(530) 752-1486
Website

Chemistry and biochemistry of lipids, the role of dietary fat on tissue and cell function, essential fatty acid metabolism and synthesis of bioactive metabolites, enzymology of lipid oxidation.

Matt J. Hengel
Asst. Adjunct Professor
Laboratory Coordinator IR-4 Western Region and Trace Analytical Laboratory
Department of Environmental Toxicology
208A Sprocket Building
(530) 752-2402
Website

Develop new and modify existing analytical methods for the determination of pesticides in the environment. These include, but are not limited to: fruits, vegetables, nuts, grains, water, air and soil matrixes. Our primary analytical tools are gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometers (GC-MS and LC-MS/MS).

Hildegarde Heymann
Professor
Viticulture & Enology
3009 Wickson Hall
(530) 754-4816
Website
Sensory analysis of wines
Anita Oberholster
Associate Specialist in Cooperative Extension in Enology
Viticulture & Enology
3146 Robert Mondavi Institute – North
(530) 754-4866
Website

Exploring the influence of viticulture practices and environmental factors on grape ripening, composition and related wine quality with emphasis on tannin and carotenoid biosynthesis. The second core research focus is investigations to determine the influence of different vinification practices on wine composition and quality. This includes studies to determine the influences of different cap management techniques and the impact of oxygen (macro- and micro-oxygenation) and wood (barrel aging and oak alternatives) on wine aging and quality.

John W. Newman
Research Chemist
USDA-ARS-WHNRC Scientist

Department of Nutrition

210 Western Human Nutrtion Research Center

(530)752-1009

Website

The Newman research group is developing and applying mass spectrometry-based targeted and untargeted metabolomics tools to investigate metabolic responses to diet and their implications in the context of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Active research areas include: 1) Investigating the functional implications of lipoprotein particle metabolomics structure on vascular and adipose physiology; 2) Investigating cross-talk between mediators of energy metabolism, inflammation, tissue growth and satiety; 3) Mapping the natural variance in metabolic responses to dietary challenges; 4) Investigating the impact of diet quality and weight maintenance/loss on metabolic indices of health; 5) Exploring the impact of bioactive foods including extra virgin olive oil, almonds, walnuts, and omega-3 fatty acid-rich products on cardiovascular and inflammatory physiology and pathophysiology.

Alyson E. Mitchell
Professor
Food Science and Technology
106 Food Sci & Tech
(530) 752-7926
Website

Food chemistry and toxicology; impact of dietary exposures on metabolism; application of LC/MS to isolate and identify bioactive food constituents.

Christopher Simmons
Associate Professor
Food Science and Technology
(530) 752-2109
Website

The Simmons laboratory researches techniques for improving energy and water use efficiency in food processing and agriculture. Our work aims to improve energy and water sustainability while providing benefits to growers and food processors. Specifically, we investigate methods to liberate fermentable sugars from food processing waste biomass for liquid biofuel production in addition to direct bioconversion of waste biomass into biogas. Moreover, we study the effects of minimally-treated recycled food processing effluents on soil and crops. Our research initiatives are coupled with a strong drive to educate our upcoming scientists and engineers.

Selina Wang
Professor

Specialist in Cooperative Extension in the Department of Food Science and Technology and Research Director of the Olive Center

Phone: 530) 752-5018

Lab page

Website

 

Dr. Wang’s research program focuses on chemical quality, purity, and nutrition parameters that occur during fruit and vegetable post-harvesting, processing and storage. The Wang lab works on (1) identifying the important chemical markers that are important for quality, purity and nutrition in food products; (2) developing robust (faster and cheaper) detection methods so they can be easily adopted by industries; and (3) modifying processing methods to improve quality, purity and nutrition.

Andrew L. Waterhouse
Professor
Viticulture and Enology
2015 Wickson Hall
(530) 752-4777
Website

We study wine oxidation reaction mechanisms in order to give winemakers better tools to manage the process and achieve their desired wine style. We also investigate the polyphenolics substances in grapes and wine, their effect on wine color and taste, and the effects of wine processing on their composition. We also address the chemical analysis of wine components that become important with regard to our research questions.

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Faculty in the Area of Fiber and Polymer Chemistry

Name Contact Info Research Interests
You-Lo Hsieh
Professor
227 Everson Hall
(530) 752-0843
Fax: (530) 752-7584Website

Nanomaterials & functional polymers: polysaccharides (cellulose, chitin, chitosan, derivatives; CNC, CNF), proteins (nanofibrils, microfibrils, films, porous network); polyphenolics; hierarchically porous & hybrids (biopolymers, carbon, ceramics); encapsulation, biocatalysts, bacteriophages; surface reactions and interfacial properties (wetting, transport, adhesion).

Gang Sun
Professor
Biological and Agricultural Eng.235 Everson Hall
(530) 752-0840
Website

Functional polymers and textile materials, personal protective materials and technologies; biological protective polymers and food safety materials, personal use and wearable sensors and materials.

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